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Thursday, August 10, 2017

10 fun facts about Washington D.C.’s Tidal Basin

Washington D.C.’s Tidal Basin is probably best known for the thousands of cherry blossom trees that dazzle the region every spring when they bloom. During this time visitors and locals alike flock to this pooled area of water to enjoy the beautiful scenery.

Aside from the cherry blossoms, the Tidal Basin also is rich in history. Not to mention is a beautiful place to visit year round. Want to know more about the Tidal Basin? Read on for some more fun facts. 

Fun facts about the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C.


1. The Tidal Basin is a partially man-made body of water, it spans an area of approximately 107 acres and is about 10 feet deep. It lies between the Potomac River and the Washington Channel.

2. A devastating flood took place in 1881 which led to the construction of the Tidal Basin, which began in 1882. Completed in 1897, the area was designed to control the levels of the Potomac River to flush out the silt and sediment from the Washington Channel and to prevent flooding. The engineering involved with building the Tidal Basin created approximately 723 acres of new land and many of the memorials currently stand on that man-made land.


Aerial view of a portion of the Tidal Basin (I'm inside the Washington Monument when I took this shot)


3. The basin’s original name was “Twining Lake” named after William Johnson Twining, of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Washington DC's first Engineer Commissioner.

4. Did you know there was once a bona fide beach at the Tidal Basin? It was located near where the Jefferson Memorial stands today and lasted for less than a decade. However, during those years it was “the place” to be according to WETA’s history blog. The official opening came with huge fanfare in 1918 (people had been swimming in the area for a few years before this) and it came with all the things you’d see at any popular beach location, changing rooms, food vendors and other beach-y like amenities. 
Image credit: By National Photo Company Collection. [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

The Tidal Basin Bathing Beach closed in 1925, never to reopen. One of the reasons for the closure was the fact the beach was segregated and funding for a second beach was cut by the Senate in February of 1925. This led to Congress permanently shuttering all beaches at the Tidal Basin. The buildings were demolished and carted away and the summer of 1925 the "shores" were reverted to being "the Tidal Basin". 

5. In modern days, a whopping 250 million gallons of water from the Potomac River comes into the Tidal Basin twice a day through the inlet gates. This water is also used to keep the water levels in the Lincoln Reflecting Pool consistent, that was a new addition in 2012 after the pool underwent an extensive renovation.

6. There is a 2.1-mile long footpath that goes around the Tidal Basin where pedestrians can stroll and enjoy the views. On this walk, you’ll see up close the Thomas Jefferson Memorial, Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial and the George Mason Memorial (you’ll have to cross a street to see this one).  Same with the John Paul Jones Memorial.  

The 2015 cherry blossom peaks were stunning. Many people came to walk around the basin


7. While the monument is not on the basin's footpath, you’ll also get stunning views of the Washington Monument, which is able to be seen from pretty much any point of the National Mall.  Taking photos from the Tidal Basin you can get some nice reflection shots of the monument in the water.


Photo taken one morning at dawn


8. The famous Yoshino cherry blossom trees were a gift to the United States from Japan in 1912. They were given by Toyko's Mayor Yukio Ozaki. A total of 3,000 cherry trees were given and some of the original historic trees still remain. You can see the place where the first cherry tree planting took place on March 27, 1912. The busiest time of year in Washington is during the peak views - people flock here each spring to see the blossoms in their magnificence.




9. A 350+-year-old 10-foot granite lantern also can be seen. Another gift from Japan, dedicated in 1954, there is a twin in Japan which signifies Japanese-American friendship. It is lit annually during the cherry blossom festival. A Japanese Pagoda, also made of granite and a gift from Japan in 1957, is also located on the Tidal Basin.

10. Paddle boats are a popular attraction on the Tidal Basin, you can rent by the hour. The rides are seasonal. The boats hold two to four passengers and there are a couple of electronic ones so you don’t have to peddle (I believe those are part of the two passenger option).



There you have it! Ten fun facts about Washington's Tidal Basin. If you haven't been to the Tidal Basin, it's a wonderful walk around if you have the time. Also, it offers some pretty views during sunrises and sunsets. 

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